DLIFLC instructors, family members, become new citizens

DLIFLC instructors, family members, become new citizens

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif. – Twelve individuals, 10 instructors and two family members, became U.S. citizens Sept. 7, at a naturalization ceremony hosted by the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center located at the Presidio of Monterey. Naturalization ceremonies are organized jointly by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services office and DLIFLC each quarter because of the large number of foreign instructors employed at the Institute. The event is organized three times per year. “It is so exciting to see entire families receive their citizenship here at DLI. I think the event becomes even more personalized by allowing family members and colleagues to come help celebrate the event,” said Helai Sanaie, who works for the Faculty Personnel Office and is one of the main coordinators for the...

Summer 2017

DLIFLC events throughout the summer of 2017 <>Lt. Gen. Michael Lundy, commanding general of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, visited the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center in Monterey, California, April 13, to see first-hand the Army's foreign language training mission. Lundy spent time observing classes in Russian, French and Spanish and spoke to students of all four branches of the services about the importance of their studies to national security. During a working lunch, Lundy spoke with DLIFLC civilian and military leadership to express his views about the importance of their contributions to the training of the future force. He also addressed DLIFLC Army cadre later in the day, reminding them of their vital role in the development of young Soldiers. (Photo by Amber K....
Record attendance for Command Language Program Manager’s Workshop at DLIFLC

Record attendance for Command Language Program Manager’s Workshop at DLIFLC

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif. – More than 200 members of all four branches of the services and Department of Defense civilians attended a three-day Advanced Command Language Program Manager Workshop held at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center Aug. 29-31. The workshop was opened by DLIFLC Assistant Commandant Col. Wiley Barnes, who welcomed the CLPMs, whose job is to help linguists maintain and improve their foreign language skills and advise them in their career paths. “Take advantage of this workshop…build relationships across services and agencies, exchange ideas, learn from each other. Don’t accept the status quo, things are always changing. Technology changes, the environment changes, and the enemy gets a vote…we have to adapt,” said Barnes. The large gathering of military and civilian foreign language community managers and leaders served as a perfect venue to give awards for the DOD Command Language Professional of the Year and the Command Language Program of the Year. The winner of the DOD’s best Command Language Program of the Year for 2016 was the Navy Information Operations Command, Maryland. The award was received by the incoming CLPM Chief Petty Officer Vernon “Duke” Smith, who accepted the cup on behalf of the work of CLPM Chief Petty Officer Kate Greifzu and her commander, Capt. J.S. Scheidt. DOD winner of the best Command Language Professional of the year went to Air Force Staff Sgt. Monica Helling, who works for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) at Travis Air Force Base as a Russian Linguist. Completely caught off guard by the recognition in this forum, in an interview Helling admitted that she...
MLIs play important  mentoring role for linguists

MLIs play important mentoring role for linguists

By Natela Cutter DLIFLC Public Affairs MONTEREY, Calif. – When Sgt. First Class Brandon Tinling graduated from his Modern Standard Arabic course about 15 years ago, he didn’t exactly know what lay ahead for him. He thought he may end up working in a cubicle, diligently chipping away at Arabic translations and analysis. Instead, he ended up deploying four times. “One day in Baghdad, while I was sitting outside on my break, one of the gate guards came running up to me to take me back over to the gate where a frantic Iraqi woman was screaming and crying. I quickly found out that her daughter had been kidnapped earlier in the day. We were able to pass that information on to the Iraqi police and they were able to find the child within 24 hours,” said Tinling. Today, as the Chief Military Language Instructor at Middle East III, Tinling runs, together with the civilian leadership, a school of about 100 teachers, eight Military Language Instructors, and several hundred students of all four branches of the service. The kidnapping in Baghdad took place just a year after his graduation in 2004, and is one of the favorite stories he tells students because it illustrates how knowledge of a foreign language saves lives. “The role of MLIs is vital at Defense Language Institute because we have been out in the field and we know what awaits these young men and women when they get out there,” explained Tinling, speaking about the mentorship role MLIs play in the schoolhouse, in addition to teaching some 10 hours per week, grading papers, tracking test results,...
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